The long-term impact of post traumatic stress disorder on recovery from heroin dependence

The high prevalence of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among people with heroin dependence and its impact on short term outcomes has been well established. The impact of PTSD on long-term recovery is, however, unknown. This paper examines the impact of current and lifetime PTSD on long-term recovery from heroin dependence among participants who took part in the 11-year follow-up of the Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS), a prospective naturalistic longitudinal study of 615 people with heroin dependence recruited from Sydney, Australia, in 2001–2002.

Universal prevention of alcohol and drug use: An overview of reviews in an Australian context

Issues: This overview of reviews will synthesise information from existing reviews to provide a summary of the evidence for universal alcohol and illicit drug prevention strategies across different intervention settings. Approach: Academic databases, including Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo were searched on 1 August 2016. All reviews and meta-analyses of universal alcohol and drug prevention conducted since 2006 were included. The reviews included in this overview were grouped according to the different settings where prevention strategies have been applied (i.e.

The relationship between methamphetamine use and heterosexual behaviour: Evidence from a prospective longitudinal study

Aims: To estimate the extent to which specific sexual behaviours (being sexually active, having multiple sex partners, casual sex, condomless casual sex, anal sex and condomless anal sex) change during periods of methamphetamine use. Design: Within-person estimates for the relationship between methamphetamine use and sexual behaviour were derived from longitudinal panel data from the Methamphetamine Treatment Evaluation Study (MATES) cohort (2006-10). Setting: Sydney and Brisbane, Australia.

Psychosocial factors associated with adolescent substance use: a longitudinal investigation

Purpose: Alcohol and cannabis are the two most commonly used substances by young people in many developed nations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the longitudinal relationships between risky substance use (binge drinking and cannabis use) and psychological distress, emotional and behavioural difficulties, and truancy among Australian adolescents. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 527 students (Mage=13.4 years, SD=0.43; 67 per cent female) from seven Australian schools completed an online self-report survey on four occasions over two years (baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months).

Estimating treatment coverage for people with substance use disorders: an analysis of data from the World Mental Health Surveys

Substance use is a major cause of disability globally. This has been recognized in the recent United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in which treatment coverage for substance use disorders is identified as one of the indicators. There have been no estimates of this treatment coverage cross-nationally, making it difficult to know what is the baseline for that SDG target. Here we report data from the World Health Organization (WHO)'s World Mental Health Surveys (WMHS), based on representative community household surveys in 26 countries.

Coping with problematic drug use in the family: An evaluation of the Stepping Stones program

Introduction and Aims: Problematic substance use by an individual is often highly destructive to their family, creating emotional turmoil and destroying healthy family functioning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of participation in the Stepping Stones family support program on the coping capacity of family members affected by another's substance use. Design and Methods: A pre and post study of the Stepping Stones intervention for families was conducted, involving 108 participants recruited from March 2013 to March 2014.

Differences in polysubstance use patterns and drug-related outcomes between people who inject drugs receiving and not receiving opioid substitution therapies

Aims: To test if polysubstance use profiles and drug-related outcomes differ between those receiving and not receiving opioid substitution therapies (OST) among people who inject drugs (PWID). Design: An annual cross-sectional, sentinel sample of PWID across Australia. Setting: Data came from 3 years (2011–13) of the Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS). Participants: A total of 2673 participants who injected drugs from the combined national IDRS samples of 2011 (n = 868), 2012 (n = 922) and 2013 (n = 883).

Evidence for sex convergence in prevalence of cannabis use: A systematic review and meta-regression Volume 78, Issue 3, 2017, Pages 344-352

Objective: Generally, cannabis use has been more prevalent in men than in women. However, emerging evidence suggests that the prevalence of cannabis use is converging among males and females from recent cohorts. This study aimed to systematically summarize published literature on birth cohort changes in male-to-female ratios in prevalence of cannabis use. Method: Twenty-two studies with a median sample size of 85,052 were identified for inclusion.

Trends in reports of driving following illicit drug consumption among regular drug users in Australia, 2007–2013: Has random roadside drug testing had a deterrent effect?

Introduction Driving following illicit drug consumption (‘drug-driving’) is a potential road safety risk. Roadside drug testing (RDT) is conducted across Australia with the dual aims of prosecuting drivers with drugs in their system and deterring drug-driving. We examined trends over time in self-reported past six-month drug-driving among sentinel samples of regular drug users and assessed the impact of experiences of RDT on drug-driving among these participants.

Pages

Subscribe to Drugs

Participate in Research

Our Research Streams