Efficacy of online lifestyle interventions targeting lifestyle behaviour change in depressed populations: A systematic review

Background: It is well established that depression and non-communicable diseases are highly co-morbid and bi-directional in nature. ‘Lifestyle medicine’ has recently gained traction in the field of psychiatry, aimed at improvement of both physical and mental health. Online interventions can be an effective and inexpensive alternative or supplement to therapy that is delivered using more traditional modes, overcoming barriers that may prohibit people from accessing treatment by promoting flexibility and accessibility.

Does providing a brief internet intervention for hazardous alcohol use to people seeking online help for depression reduce both alcohol use and depression symptoms among participants with these co-occurring disorders? Study protocol for a randomised...

Introduction Hazardous alcohol consumption is common among people experiencing depression, often acting to exacerbate depressive symptoms. While many people with these co-occurring disorders do not seek face-to-face treatment, they do seek help online. There are effective internet interventions that target hazardous alcohol consumption or depression separately but none that combine these online interventions without the involvement of a therapist.

Efficacy, safety, and durability of repeated ketamine infusions for comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder and treatment-resistant depression

Objective: The present study examined the efficacy, safety, and durability of repeated ketamine infusions for the treatment of comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and treatment-resistant depression (TRD) in a sample of veterans.

A smartphone application for treating depressive symptoms: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Background: Depression is a commonly occurring disorder linked to diminished role functioning and quality of life. The development of treatments that overcome barriers to accessing treatment remains an important area of clinical research as most people delay or do not receive treatment at an appropriate time. The workplace is an ideal setting to roll-out an intervention, particularly given the substantial psychological benefits associated with remaining in the workforce.

Is self-guided internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) harmful? An individual participant data meta-analysis

Background: Little is known about potential harmful effects as a consequence of self-guided internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT), such as symptom deterioration rates. Thus, safety concerns remain and hamper the implementation of self-guided iCBT into clinical practice. We aimed to conduct an individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis to determine the prevalence of clinically significant deterioration (symptom worsening) in adults with depressive symptoms who received self-guided iCBT compared with control conditions.

Subcortical brain structure and suicidal behaviour in major depressive disorder: A meta-analysis from the ENIGMA-MDD working group

The aetiology of suicidal behaviour is complex, and knowledge about its neurobiological mechanisms is limited. Neuroimaging methods provide a noninvasive approach to explore the neural correlates of suicide vulnerability in vivo. The ENIGMA-MDD Working Group is an international collaboration evaluating neuroimaging and clinical data from thousands of individuals collected by research groups from around the world. Here we present analyses in a subset sample (n = 3097) for whom suicidality data were available.

Preventing depression in final year secondary students: School-based randomized controlled trial

Background: Depression often emerges for the first time during adolescence. There is accumulating evidence that universal depression prevention programs may have the capacity to reduce the impact of depression when delivered in the school environment. Objective: This trial investigated the effectiveness of SPARX-R, a gamified online cognitive behavior therapy intervention for the prevention of depression relative to an attention-matched control intervention delivered to students prior to facing a significant stressor-final secondary school exams.

The relationship between social support networks and depression in the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being

Purpose: Social isolation and low levels of social support are associated with depression. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between depression and social connectivity factors (frequency of contact and quality of social connections) in the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being. Methods: A national survey of 8841 participants aged 16–85 years was conducted.

eHealth interventions for the prevention of depression and anxiety in the general population: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Background: Anxiety and depression are associated with a range of adverse outcomes and represent a large global burden to individuals and health care systems. Prevention programs are an important way to avert a proportion of the burden associated with such conditions both at a clinical and subclinical level. eHealth interventions provide an opportunity to offer accessible, acceptable, easily disseminated globally low-cost interventions on a wide scale. However, the efficacy of these programs remains unclear.

Therapeutic Alliance, Client Need for Approval, and Perfectionism as Differential Moderators of Response to eHealth and Traditionally Delivered Treatments for Comorbid Depression and Substance Use Problems

Purpose: This study sought to undertake an exploratory analysis of the impact of therapeutic alliance and dysfunctional attitudes (perfectionism and need for approval) on outcomes for participants receiving therapist-delivered and eHealth interventions for comorbid depression and alcohol/cannabis use problems. These factors have been shown in previous research to moderate response to psychological treatment for depression and related disorders.

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