Pathways to prevention: Protocol for the CAP (Climate and Preventure) study to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of school-based universal, selective and combined alcohol misuse prevention into early adulthood

Background: Alcohol use and associated harms are among the leading causes of burden of disease among young people, highlighting the need for effective prevention. The Climate and Preventure (CAP) study was the first trial of a combined universal and selective school-based approach to preventing alcohol misuse among adolescents. Initial results indicate that universal, selective and combined prevention were all effective in delaying the uptake of alcohol use and binge drinking for up to 3 years following the interventions.

RADAR study: protocol for an observational cohort study to identify early warning signals on the pathways to alcohol use disorder

INTRODUCTION: Harmful alcohol consumption, particularly alcohol use disorder (AUD), is a worldwide health priority, contributing substantially to global morbidity and mortality. The peak age of onset of AUD is 18-24, thus a deeper understanding of the young adult experience is vital if we are to identify modifiable risk factors and intervene early in the developmental course of this disabling disorder. Critical unanswered questions include: How soon after drinking initiation do AUD symptoms begin to emerge? Which symptoms come first? Do the symptoms unfold in a predictable pattern?

Universal prevention of alcohol and drug use: An overview of reviews in an Australian context

Issues: This overview of reviews will synthesise information from existing reviews to provide a summary of the evidence for universal alcohol and illicit drug prevention strategies across different intervention settings. Approach: Academic databases, including Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo were searched on 1 August 2016. All reviews and meta-analyses of universal alcohol and drug prevention conducted since 2006 were included. The reviews included in this overview were grouped according to the different settings where prevention strategies have been applied (i.e.

Climate schools plus: An online, combined student and parent, universal drug prevention program

Early initiation of substance use significantly increases one's risk of developing substance use dependence and mental disorders later in life. To interrupt this trajectory, effective prevention during the adolescent period is critical. Parents play a key role in preventing substance use and related harms among adolescents and parenting interventions have been identified as critical components of effective prevention programs.

Association of parental supply of alcohol with adolescent drinking, alcohol-related harms, and alcohol use disorder symptoms: a prospective cohort study

Background: Some parents supply alcohol to their children, reportedly to reduce harm, yet longitudinal research on risks associated with such supply is compromised by short periods of observation and potential confounding. We aimed to investigate associations between parental supply and supply from other (non-parental) sources, with subsequent drinking outcomes over a 6-year period of adolescence, adjusting for child, parent, family, and peer variables.

A systematic review of school-based eHealth interventions targeting alcohol use, smoking, physical inactivity, diet, sedentary behaviour and sleep among adolescents: A review protocol

Background: Six key behavioural risk factors (risky alcohol use, smoking, poor diet, physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour and unhealthy sleep patterns) have been identified as strong determinants of chronic disease, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancers. School-based interventions targeting these multiple health risk behaviours among adolescents have the potential to halt the trajectory towards later disease, whilst online and mobile technology interventions offer advantages in terms of student engagement, reach and scalability.

Psychosocial factors associated with adolescent substance use: a longitudinal investigation

Purpose: Alcohol and cannabis are the two most commonly used substances by young people in many developed nations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the longitudinal relationships between risky substance use (binge drinking and cannabis use) and psychological distress, emotional and behavioural difficulties, and truancy among Australian adolescents. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 527 students (Mage=13.4 years, SD=0.43; 67 per cent female) from seven Australian schools completed an online self-report survey on four occasions over two years (baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months).

Trajectories of emotional symptoms in adolescence: impact on alcohol use

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how different trajectories of emotional symptoms relate to alcohol use in adolescence. Design/methodology/approach: In all, 431 participants (majority female), aged approximately 13 years at baseline were followed over three years and reported on their emotional symptoms and alcohol use. Latent class growth analyses explored different trajectories of emotional symptoms and regression models were run to relate these trajectories to alcohol use (full standard drink, and binge drinking) at 36-month follow-up (age 16 years).

The Interactive Effects of Personality Profiles and Perceived Peer Drinking on Early Adolescent Drinking

Early adolescent drinking has been identified as an important risk factor for the development of alcohol dependence. Both perceived peer drinking and personality profiles have been implicated as risk factors for early adolescent drinking. However, research is yet to determine how these 2 factors may interact to increase such risk. This study aimed to determine whether personality profiles moderated the relationship between perceived peer drinking and early adolescent drinking.

Estimating treatment coverage for people with substance use disorders: an analysis of data from the World Mental Health Surveys

Substance use is a major cause of disability globally. This has been recognized in the recent United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in which treatment coverage for substance use disorders is identified as one of the indicators. There have been no estimates of this treatment coverage cross-nationally, making it difficult to know what is the baseline for that SDG target. Here we report data from the World Health Organization (WHO)'s World Mental Health Surveys (WMHS), based on representative community household surveys in 26 countries.

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